G-459C19WVXB 1479953155842238 Politics and Religion - The Constitution Commandos

Episode 26

full
Published on:

19th Sep 2023

Politics and Religion

The Constitution Commandos

[00:00] I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America,
And to the Republic for which it stands,
One nation, under God, indivisible,
With liberty and justice for all.

[00:15]

Sign up for our weekly emails to get notifications about new episodes I publish, exclusive content, and you will receive your own copy of The Declaration of Independence and The Constitution of the United States.

Explicit

[03:30] Politics and Religion around the dinner table

[04:55] Riley Gaines ties Lia Thomas in the last swim meet

[08:13] Roe v Wade

[14:43] Indoctrination replaces Education

Listen to The Constitution Commandos

[17:18] Airline recruitment geared toward ethnicity over qualifications

[18:36] Affirmative Action and Labor Unions

[22:52] White cops are not shooting unarmed black men

That concludes our show for today and we thank you for being

here with us. If you liked today’s show, rate and review us on Podchaser. It

only takes a moment and it would help us tremendously. Subscribe to get our

weekly emails and your personal copy of The Declaration of Independence and The

Constitution of the United States of America. Until next time, and on behalf of

my brother and myself, we are The Constitution Commandos and we are signing

off.

Transcript
Speaker:

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Speaker:

Good fellow Americans, it is privelege to live in the only country in the world where we can still breathe the fresh air of liberty.

Speaker:

Hey, we're glad you're here with us today and welcome you to episode 26.

Speaker:

Today.

Speaker:

It's all about politics and religion.

Speaker:

Go ahead and share your thoughts on the subject.

Speaker:

Send us an email at podcast@theconstitutioncommandos.org.

Speaker:

I'm your host Chris Williams.

Speaker:

My brother Patrick Williams is the co host.

Speaker:

And we are the Constitution Commandos.

Speaker:

I don't know if I ever told you about this before, but you never...

Speaker:

Tell certain jokes around certain people unless they know it's a joke first.

Speaker:

I was at the VA with a buddy of mine one day and both of us going to the same place and sat in the waiting room and I was telling him about,

Speaker:

well he asked me already if You know, about the seals and how they work and everything that somehow I got into the Marines also could be seals.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

And, while we were talking about it, we sit down in the waiting room and of course I'm not paying attention to my surroundings, but I told him, I said,

Speaker:

yeah, you know, it sucks though for Marine Corps, if they don't make it through the seals, they rock out or ring the bell or whatever he said, what?

Speaker:

And I said, for the rest of their career, they got to wear a sailor's uniform.

Speaker:

And this guy in there, man, he went ballistic on me.

Speaker:

He was like, I used to work with the seals.

Speaker:

That ain't true.

Speaker:

You need to change.

Speaker:

I was like, Hey, calm down there chief.

Speaker:

It was a joke.

Speaker:

You've been in the military that long and you don't know who pick on each other.

Speaker:

Oh, me.

Speaker:

Yep.

Speaker:

Yeah, I was trying to convince that guy the Marines are not going to rock out of seals because they don't want to spend the rest of their career in a Navy uniform.

Speaker:

Damn, I forgot I changed states.

Speaker:

I got a scale house up here.

Speaker:

I hope this summer guns close.

Speaker:

I just got behind a TNI and he's running in the mid 60s.

Speaker:

I'm like, this sucks.

Speaker:

Well, if you have to stop, you tell them you can't talk to them right now, you're in the podcast.

Speaker:

You could,

Patrick Williams:

no, I don't think so.

Patrick Williams:

Cause they'll have me sitting there all day.

Patrick Williams:

I got to drop in the morning.

Patrick Williams:

I got to get on the asses of these guys up there in the office.

Patrick Williams:

They need to give me my day.

Patrick Williams:

Free pass.

Patrick Williams:

They need to make that happen ASAP.

Patrick Williams:

I think

Chris Williams:

I'm going to start.

Chris Williams:

Breaking it down for people and you started making me think of it the other day on that other podcast, when you said younger generation needs to quit

Chris Williams:

redefining words and of course we had talked about it before about how, how do we communicate with these people?

Patrick Williams:

You know, through emojis.

Chris Williams:

WTF.

Chris Williams:

Yeah, but then there's another thing I was watching on Newsmax last night.

Chris Williams:

One of the reporters was walking around New York and everywhere else, I suppose, and asking people if they were going to be eating Thanksgiving dinner with people who had opposing political views.

Chris Williams:

And they were like, Oh, we don't talk politics in my house.

Patrick Williams:

Yes, we will be, but we're just not going to be able to talk about it so that we can be friendly or, you know, the talk has been going on forever.

Patrick Williams:

Right.

Patrick Williams:

We do not talk politics and religion in this house.

Patrick Williams:

Well, that's good to know because I don't like politics and I don't like religion as a matter of fact, Jesus doesn't like religion either.

Patrick Williams:

However, we can talk about government and we can talk about Christianity.

Patrick Williams:

Those things we can definitely talk about.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah.

Patrick Williams:

I figured once I get through explaining all that stuff, which I may never get through explaining it.

Patrick Williams:

Well, well, number one, there's a number there.

Patrick Williams:

Okay.

Patrick Williams:

I can think of quite a few words that.

Patrick Williams:

Right off the bat should be defined for people.

Patrick Williams:

And like you said, one of them is Republic constitutional Republic or

Chris Williams:

Republic or democracy.

Patrick Williams:

We have a male and female, because I know we have a lot of people that will swear that a man can get pregnant.

Chris Williams:

Yeah.

Chris Williams:

Oh, you heard about that?

Chris Williams:

you heard about that girl that swim team that was racing against, what's her name?

Chris Williams:

Leah or something, or other.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, I know who you're talking about.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, but that, that, that done happen.

Patrick Williams:

Wow.

Patrick Williams:

Is there something new about that?

Chris Williams:

Well, I don't know how new it was, but apparently the last swim meet they had, he didn't beat her.

Chris Williams:

She tied with him.

Patrick Williams:

Leah Thomas, I think was her name.

Chris Williams:

Yeah.

Chris Williams:

Yeah.

Chris Williams:

That the girl that, was really working hard on scholarships and all that kind of stuff when that dude started swimming with

Patrick Williams:

yeah.

Chris Williams:

And he was just blowing them away.

Chris Williams:

But the last meet they had, apparently she tied with him.

Patrick Williams:

Wow.

Chris Williams:

And, she's been going all over the country to colleges everywhere, talking to people about biological men competing in female sports, which, you know, I don't, I don't take sides of people.

Chris Williams:

I take sides of right or wrong, and we're going to go with right men get the hell out of women's sports.

Chris Williams:

But, anyway, she went to one college, I think it was Georgetown of all places.

Chris Williams:

And man, she, she caught the riffraff there.

Chris Williams:

And they.

Chris Williams:

Taking sidewalk paint or whatever, paint all over the floors inside the atrium and.

Chris Williams:

I mean, booing her, poking her, everything, tell her she needs to swim faster.

Chris Williams:

And I was like, Hey, look, is she tied with a guy?

Chris Williams:

I don't think faster is what she needs to do.

Chris Williams:

She needs to take a break now.

Chris Williams:

I mean, really, I think that she'd even have to talk about that.

Chris Williams:

I mean, why are we even discussing these things?

Chris Williams:

I mean,

Patrick Williams:

well, we're all the feminists.

Patrick Williams:

That's what I want to know.

Patrick Williams:

That's what's so funny to me.

Patrick Williams:

You got these people.

Patrick Williams:

You know, feminists are all, you know, women can do anything men can do, right?

Patrick Williams:

We can do it better.

Patrick Williams:

Well, the thing I wanna know is where are all these feminists screaming to the top of their lungs about why are we com this is a woman's sport.

Patrick Williams:

Why are we competing against men?

Patrick Williams:

You know what I mean?

Patrick Williams:

Well, I, I don't, but you got so many people out there that are like, oh no, she belongs in a woman's sport.

Patrick Williams:

He's a woman.

Patrick Williams:

No, he is not a woman.

Chris Williams:

No, he is not.

Chris Williams:

And that's, I, I don't know if that came from all the lies of the government or Tavistock ideologies of what, but somehow.

Chris Williams:

It's, it's been very rapid.

Chris Williams:

I feel like though in the last couple of years, three years, maybe people have come to this, oh, it's okay for guys to compete in women's sport.

Chris Williams:

No, it's not.

Chris Williams:

When is it ever, you know, and this abortion thing that's gotten way out of hand.

Chris Williams:

I mean, way out of hand.

Chris Williams:

I don't understand this, the thought process behind it is like, who was that to said something to the, along the lines of, having babies is what causes inflation.

Chris Williams:

Okay.

Chris Williams:

So you're going to say abortion is okay.

Chris Williams:

Well, I have a better idea.

Chris Williams:

Save a life.

Chris Williams:

Close your legs.

Chris Williams:

Problem solved.

Chris Williams:

Stacey Abrams.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, that's who said that..

Chris Williams:

But who comes up with these retarded arguments?

Chris Williams:

I mean, that's not even an argument.

Chris Williams:

It's not even a valid argument.

Chris Williams:

And

Patrick Williams:

Chris, you got to remember the same people that say men can have babies.

Chris Williams:

Yeah.

Chris Williams:

I don't know what world that came from.

Patrick Williams:

But okay.

Patrick Williams:

There's another thing about the abortion is an argument.

Patrick Williams:

okay.

Patrick Williams:

Number one, the overturning of Roe versus Wade did absolutely nothing to prevent abortions.

Patrick Williams:

The only thing it did no did was it gave each state the right to make their own laws, which that state is comprised of elected officials, which are appointed and elected by the people of that state.

Chris Williams:

So what you're telling me is we went from a democracy to a republic.

Patrick Williams:

Well, see, this is the thing.

Patrick Williams:

Then they talk about, oh, you're denying women's health and women are going to die all over the country because of this.

Patrick Williams:

And it's like, no, even the states that are vehemently opposed to the idea of abortion.

Patrick Williams:

If the mother's life is at risk, that is the if that's a viable option, that's what happens to save the mother.

Chris Williams:

I'm not real big on abortion at all, but I think if there ever had to be an abortion, God forgive me if I'm wrong.

Chris Williams:

It would have to be in cases like one of my ex girlfriends, the baby got caught in her fallopian tubes.

Chris Williams:

You know, what do you do with that?

Chris Williams:

You know, I mean, in certain cases, it's going to be either the baby's life or the mother's life, but not both.

Chris Williams:

You know what I mean?

Patrick Williams:

Well, yeah, but see, the thing about it is, even the states that have restrictions, On times to get abortions, even the States with

Patrick Williams:

the strictest restrictions or the strictest laws governing over abortion, if the mother's life is at risk, even those States allow it, you understand?

Patrick Williams:

So they always want to say, Oh, women's health or, you know, that's their medical decision, or women are going to die because of this law.

Patrick Williams:

They're not gonna die.

Patrick Williams:

First off, you wouldn't have an abortion.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, you wouldn't have an abortion if you weren't pregnant and you wouldn't be pregnant if you didn't spread your legs and some guy come over there and give you his damn sperm.

Patrick Williams:

So, you had a part in this.

Patrick Williams:

It's called consequences.

Patrick Williams:

If you have sex unprotected, a possible outcome is pregnancy.

Patrick Williams:

Pregnancy is a child.

Chris Williams:

Well, see now that's, that's even going, that's even falling into the, into the narrative that we were being taught.

Chris Williams:

What was the point in prop, what do they call those things?

Chris Williams:

Propyl, propyl prophylactics, right?

Chris Williams:

Yeah.

Chris Williams:

Remember when we were kids, the answer to sex was no sex till you're married.

Chris Williams:

Right.

Chris Williams:

And now we're willing to say, protect the sex.

Chris Williams:

Yeah.

Chris Williams:

Okay.

Chris Williams:

No, not okay.

Chris Williams:

We've been brainwashed, but anyway, yeah, I don't, yeah.

Chris Williams:

The arguments don't stand up.

Chris Williams:

But I've noticed though, that most of the people making those arguments are those people who are in some kind of seat in politics where they can make legislation happen.

Patrick Williams:

There's a lot of college students that make those arguments, people that come through these indoctrination camps called colleges or public education.

Patrick Williams:

They all share the same damn belief because they're too.

Patrick Williams:

Stupid to do a little research and critical thinking and understand that they're being lied to.

Chris Williams:

Well, their idea of critical thinking is having someone oppose them in an argument so they can say you're a racist.

Chris Williams:

Oh, yeah, man, that's the extent of their critical thinking.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, that that's always a winning argument right there.

Chris Williams:

Well, it's not so much the argument.

Chris Williams:

I mean, they really have to think about if they're going to call you a racist xenophobe or whatever.

Chris Williams:

I mean, that's, you know, that multiple choice stuff is really tough.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah.

Patrick Williams:

It's just to me.

Patrick Williams:

You know, personally, if I acted like a lot of these people that, you know, that's the first thing to come out of their mouth, they don't want to have an honest debate about something.

Chris Williams:

We wouldn't have gotten away with that.

Patrick Williams:

I want to call you a racist or a homophobe or whatever phobe, those people I am embarrassed for them.

Patrick Williams:

And I don't, I don't know any other way to say it.

Patrick Williams:

I, I am deeply embarrassed for those people.

Patrick Williams:

It's like, I would hide my head.

Patrick Williams:

Well, yeah, I mean, I would hide my face in shame if that was my argument, you know, I mean, I would walk around and say that.

Chris Williams:

You and I can say that because, you know, if we had ever done that, anything close to that, when we were growing up, we would have been probably laying out in the middle of the road, decapitated.

Chris Williams:

There's no way we'd have gotten away with anything like that.

Chris Williams:

But we were taught to use critical thinking.

Chris Williams:

I was just about to send another invite, but I see you made it back in.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, man.

Patrick Williams:

Here I am right here, man.

Chris Williams:

Here I am.

Chris Williams:

Yeah.

Chris Williams:

How do you like my eagle?

Chris Williams:

My thing didn't show up good.

Chris Williams:

It's supposed to have the, yeah, I got each one of the military branches represented at the feet, at the claws, but you can't see it.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, no, I like it.

Patrick Williams:

I gotta take this damn jacket off.

Patrick Williams:

My ass is getting warm.

Patrick Williams:

I just had to turn my fan on.

Patrick Williams:

I was getting the same way.

Patrick Williams:

I wish they had autopilot in these things, man.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, it'd be nice if I could just let go of everything and take this jacket off.

Chris Williams:

Yeah, I imagine Google's got one of them coming for you pretty soon.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, I won't drive it.

Chris Williams:

Neither will anybody else.

Patrick Williams:

Ha ha ha ha.

Chris Williams:

Ha ha ha.

Patrick Williams:

That's right.

Chris Williams:

Ha ha.

Chris Williams:

Way out here, they keep wrecking a lot of them.

Patrick Williams:

I just gotta quit swerving all over the dang road.

Patrick Williams:

I'm gonna get a ticket for reckless driving.

Patrick Williams:

Alright.

Patrick Williams:

I'm just glad ain't nobody around me, so.

Patrick Williams:

Ain't nobody at risk.

Patrick Williams:

I know the people that are behind me are probably like, What the hell?

Patrick Williams:

This guy's been driving too many hours.

Patrick Williams:

He needs to park.

Chris Williams:

Right.

Chris Williams:

So the indoctrination in schools has been a very dangerous thing for sure.

Patrick Williams:

Yep.

Chris Williams:

I know it's been enough to piss me off since I started studying a lot of this stuff recently.

Chris Williams:

I feel like this is stuff.

Chris Williams:

We should have been taught when we were in elementary school.

Patrick Williams:

Oh, yeah.

Chris Williams:

But like I told you that, you know, when Tory came home at 13 years old and had no idea who Abraham Lincoln was, I knew we were in some serious trouble then.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, but we don't teach our kids to compete on world stage.

Patrick Williams:

And it's sad.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, we got kids right now.

Patrick Williams:

It's like Celita teaches Caden and Layla how to do math the way we taught.

Patrick Williams:

We were taught.

Chris Williams:

No common core.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, because they can't figure out what the hell's going on with it.

Patrick Williams:

Who can't, can't, can't understand it.

Patrick Williams:

Laryn don't understand it.

Patrick Williams:

Salida don't understand it.

Chris Williams:

Well, the fed doesn't understand it.

Chris Williams:

I'm sorry.

Chris Williams:

Go ahead.

Patrick Williams:

Nobody understands it.

Patrick Williams:

So, I mean, we're not teaching our, see, that's, that's one of the things that just totally ask why, why are we doing this?

Patrick Williams:

Don't say, Oh, it's a different way to do it.

Patrick Williams:

No, it's not.

Patrick Williams:

It's not even a different way.

Patrick Williams:

The problem is math.

Patrick Williams:

is universal.

Patrick Williams:

Mathematics spans and breaks all language barriers.

Patrick Williams:

Math is the same in China, in Norway, in Australia, in Argentina.

Patrick Williams:

It's the same all over the freaking world.

Chris Williams:

Whether you use the imperial system or the metric system, it's all the same.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, and if you go far enough, you're gonna learn them both.

Patrick Williams:

But the thing about it is, is we're teaching this stupid shit.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, how in the world are they gonna be able to compete on a world stage?

Patrick Williams:

I mean,

Chris Williams:

what we're teaching is not even stupid.

Chris Williams:

What we're teaching them is, it's not even sex education.

Chris Williams:

It's how to have sex when they're three or four years old.

Chris Williams:

What is that all about?

Chris Williams:

That's that's asinine.

Patrick Williams:

Well, we're definitely not stretching the minds of the youth.

Patrick Williams:

We are indoctrinating the shit out of them.

Patrick Williams:

Making them dumb as hell.

Chris Williams:

Right.

Chris Williams:

And there's no doubt about that.

Chris Williams:

I told a buddy of mine once, talking about getting old and always complaining.

Chris Williams:

I said, if I ever get like that, would you do me a favor and just shoot me in the head?

Chris Williams:

And he said, you want me to use your gun or mine?

Chris Williams:

Ha ha ha ha ha.

Chris Williams:

But, that's really about the way I feel about getting to the point where, I can't take care of myself anymore because, none of these kids today, I want them anywhere near me if I need to be took care of.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, they're, they're, I mean, I just, yeah, it's, it's remarkable, man.

Patrick Williams:

And then they keep pushing all these damn racial quotas, like.

Patrick Williams:

Airlines are talking about, well, we're going to start hiring more pilots that are ethnic minorities.

Patrick Williams:

And it's like,

Chris Williams:

you can't even keep a payroll going with what you've got.

Patrick Williams:

Well, the thing about it for me is, why don't you just hire the best person for the job?

Patrick Williams:

The one that's most likely able to land the aircraft.

Patrick Williams:

Full of people successfully.

Patrick Williams:

So those people can Live, why are you worried about hiring based on skin color, the whole premise behind Martin Luther King speech?

Patrick Williams:

I had a dream speech was that we would all be treated equally off of the merit of us, our actions, not off this amount of melanin in our fucking skin.

Patrick Williams:

And they're like, Oh, we're going to start hiring more ethnic minorities.

Patrick Williams:

What the fuck is that about?

Patrick Williams:

The world is turning on its head.

Patrick Williams:

No, no, no, no.

Patrick Williams:

If I have to have open heart surgery, I want the most qualified heart surgeon.

Patrick Williams:

I don't want somebody that just got the job because he took common core.

Patrick Williams:

He couldn't.

Chris Williams:

I'm going to have to have open heart surgery, I'm requesting Ben Carson just saying.

Patrick Williams:

Well, yeah, but I mean, I want the best person for the job.

Patrick Williams:

I don't want, I don't believe the person, the person that got to that point, well, affirmative actions got off the rails.

Patrick Williams:

They need to get rid of affirmative action on all across the board because it ain't no different than labor unions.

Patrick Williams:

There was a time.

Patrick Williams:

There was a time, there was a time when credit unions were needed.

Patrick Williams:

You know, mid 1800s to the early 1900s.

Patrick Williams:

We did have young people working in dangerous positions.

Patrick Williams:

A lot of people lost limbs live.

Patrick Williams:

Bad conditions.

Patrick Williams:

Hey, unions were needed back then, but nowadays coal mines and railroads.

Patrick Williams:

Well, yeah, but nowadays the union ain't needed for nothing.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, work labor laws cover everything that a union is going to say they're fighting for.

Patrick Williams:

The only difference is the union gets your work labor laws say, okay.

Patrick Williams:

So then you got to turn around and look at affirmative action.

Patrick Williams:

At one time, affirmative action had a place, you know?

Patrick Williams:

Yeah.

Patrick Williams:

There was a part after the civil rights movement where some people were like.

Patrick Williams:

Oh, you're black or you're Asian or this, I don't want to hire you or, but, and because of that, well, affirmative act, it had his day.

Patrick Williams:

That day's gone now.

Patrick Williams:

People do not.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, am I going to sit here and say that nobody sees color?

Patrick Williams:

I'm sure people out there still do, but you know what?

Patrick Williams:

Well, let's go back to the basics.

Patrick Williams:

They're fucking American.

Patrick Williams:

They got the right to feel however they want.

Patrick Williams:

And if it's their company, they got the right to hire or fire you for whatever reason they want.

Patrick Williams:

Now, affirmative action is bullshit.

Patrick Williams:

All of these damn quotas that are trying to be met across the board, throughout corporate life.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, it's just ludicrous.

Patrick Williams:

I want to pull my hair out.

Chris Williams:

Well, if you think about the numbers of Donald Trump poll while he was still in office, you know, he talked about it quite a bit.

Chris Williams:

The unemployment rate was down all across the board in African, African American communities, Asian America, everybody across the board, unemployment was down that tells me he wasn't really targeting any particular race or any particular.

Chris Williams:

neighborhood or anything like that, he was working it all the way across America.

Chris Williams:

And that's what it takes.

Chris Williams:

Now, I mean, if you, if you're hearing the same people that I hear, and, and I'm talking even the famous people, it's more, more black people, really, that I hear saying, I don't even understand why we're talking about this.

Chris Williams:

This is crazy.

Chris Williams:

You know, Morgan Freeman told Dan Rather, well, I'll tell you what, if you'll quit calling me a black man, I'll quit calling you a white man.

Chris Williams:

Yeah.

Chris Williams:

You know?

Patrick Williams:

It's that simple.

Patrick Williams:

And then you look at,

Chris Williams:

What's that rapper's name?

Chris Williams:

I've never really been big to listen to because of his voice, more than anything, but he's one of the highest paid in the business, Lil Wayne.

Chris Williams:

Lil Wayne was asked the same question about what he thought about racism in America.

Chris Williams:

He said, what about it?

Chris Williams:

I grew up in a predominantly white neighborhood.

Chris Williams:

He said, I've never had that problem.

Chris Williams:

You know?

Chris Williams:

It's like, it's like they're just goading This, the kind

Patrick Williams:

Well, they gotta keep it alive.

Chris Williams:

Yeah.

Chris Williams:

They gotta keep it alive because it keeps division going

Patrick Williams:

well, and it gives them a platform to run on.

Patrick Williams:

We're gonna create a problem so we can say, we're gonna fix that problem.

Patrick Williams:

That's right.

Patrick Williams:

Say, why don't you just not create the problem?

Patrick Williams:

Because the Republicans, they wouldn't be elected.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah.

Patrick Williams:

Republicans do it also.

Patrick Williams:

But see, that's the thing that they, they, they treat us like we're stupid.

Patrick Williams:

And there are a lot of people in this country that are honest to God stupid because they buy into this stuff.

Patrick Williams:

But, I mean, it's a simple fact of, you know what?

Patrick Williams:

Quit doing that.

Patrick Williams:

Quit goading people.

Patrick Williams:

And pitting people against each other.

Patrick Williams:

Let's try that for a little while.

Patrick Williams:

And then, the real problems of America will surface.

Patrick Williams:

And you can work on them.

Patrick Williams:

Like homelessness, and hunger.

Patrick Williams:

If they're

Chris Williams:

doing that, we'll actually get something done.

Patrick Williams:

Well, I know, but I had, well, it's people need to wake up and say, oh, if it's, if any politician on a ticket for this office brings up a race, don't vote for them, they're playing a game.

Patrick Williams:

That's all they're doing now.

Patrick Williams:

If they sit up there and they say.

Patrick Williams:

I'm going to work hard in my district for my constituents.

Patrick Williams:

I didn't hear anything about color.

Patrick Williams:

Your constituents are across all ethnicities.

Patrick Williams:

People need to quit falling for this stupid crap.

Chris Williams:

Well, you know, I, I heard, I wish I could remember this guy's name.

Chris Williams:

I even tried looking for the interview, but I saw an interview with another hip hop artist or rap artist, whatever you call them.

Chris Williams:

I don't know.

Chris Williams:

Now I got too many genres of music.

Chris Williams:

But, this guy's obviously pretty big in the business, but, he was, Approached with the question of, you know, the white cops killing unarmed black people.

Chris Williams:

And he was like, don't you think your fan base is getting a little upset because you're not writing any of this in your songs?

Chris Williams:

And he said, I don't care.

Chris Williams:

They said, well, why don't you?

Chris Williams:

He said, because it's not happening.

Chris Williams:

He said, as a matter of fact, he said the ones that are getting shot more than anybody else by police officers are middle aged white men with mental disorders.

Chris Williams:

That's the facts.

Chris Williams:

And I'm sitting here thinking, man, they just can't trap some people, can they?

Chris Williams:

I didn't even know that until he said that.

Chris Williams:

I had to go look it up to see if he was telling the truth.

Chris Williams:

But it was a very simple answer.

Chris Williams:

I'm not going to write about it because it's not happening.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, but there's a lot of stuff in them.

Patrick Williams:

Music industry, especially when it comes to cultural music.

Patrick Williams:

I mean,

Chris Williams:

a lot of it's there to create a problem, but well, it goes deeper than that.

Patrick Williams:

I was watching this interview and this guy was talking, I don't know.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, I don't know anything about the rap scene.

Patrick Williams:

I know who Snoop Dogg is.

Patrick Williams:

I know who Ice T, Ice Cube, I know.

Patrick Williams:

Yeah, he did.

Patrick Williams:

I know the names, you know.

Patrick Williams:

Right.

Patrick Williams:

And I might be familiar with some of the artist stuff, but I, I'm not, I, I have no idea who the guy was, but he was sitting there talking about he was invited to a large, upscale, posh party.

Patrick Williams:

And it was what, who hosted it were people that were fundraising for private prisons.

Patrick Williams:

And there were congressmen or there were legislators there and music label directors and heads of labels.

Patrick Williams:

And they were sitting there talking about to all of these people, you know, you're in the club, you have to gear your music to thug type of shit because it is so influential.

Patrick Williams:

What they were trying to do was increase the amount of arrests so they could feel these private prisons.

Patrick Williams:

And the guy said he wasn't going to do it.

Patrick Williams:

Now he didn't sit there and.

Patrick Williams:

He just said that went against everything that he knew to be right.

Patrick Williams:

He wasn't going to do it because it was wrong, which in my opinion, he was right for saying that.

Patrick Williams:

And with a little research, people can find, I don't even remember the guy's name.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, it was, I saw it on YouTube or something like that.

Chris Williams:

I wonder if that's the same guy that I saw because it sounds like it.

Patrick Williams:

Well, it's part of the CIA.

Patrick Williams:

op man.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, it's flood the culture and the funny thing about it.

Patrick Williams:

more white people listen to rap music than black people, okay?

Patrick Williams:

And, but you flood the culture or a demographic trash.

Patrick Williams:

I mean, when I say trash, I'm talking about the lyrics, you know, and it does tend to influence people's behavior.

Patrick Williams:

Well,

Chris Williams:

it absolutely does.

Patrick Williams:

So you start talking.

Patrick Williams:

And glorifying criminal activities.

Patrick Williams:

surprised when your listeners become criminals.

Patrick Williams:

Well, and what they're doing is they're stocking these damn private prisons that are getting government paychecks to operate, you know?

Patrick Williams:

And it's a business.

Chris Williams:

That concludes our show for today and we thank you for being here with us.

Chris Williams:

If you liked today's show, rate it and review us on podchaser.

Chris Williams:

com.

Chris Williams:

It only takes a moment, and it would help us tremendously.

Chris Williams:

Subscribe to get our weekly emails and your personal copy of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States of America.

Chris Williams:

Until next time, and on behalf of my brother and myself, we're the Constitution Commandos.

Chris Williams:

Signing off.

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About the Podcast

The Constitution Commandos
Striving to Stir up the American Spirit
Welcome to The Constitution Commandos!
We are a dedicated team committed to shining a light on the circumstances, events, and individuals that pose a threat to the sanctity of America’s Constitution. Our mission is to foster understanding, stimulate dialogue, and inspire action in defense of our nation’s foundational document.

Each week, we delve into the pressing issues that challenge the Constitution’s principles. We explore historical precedents, dissect current events, and forecast potential implications. The discussions on the Constitution Commandos podcast are deeply rooted in personal experiences, life teachings, education, and research. This unique blend of sources ensures that the conversations are both personal and informative, providing our listeners with a comprehensive understanding of the importance and necessity of protecting the Constitution of the United States.

The Constitution Commandos is more than just a podcast; it’s a call to arms for every citizen who values the freedoms and rights enshrined in our Constitution. We believe that knowledge is power, and through our discussions, we aim to equip our listeners with the knowledge they need to safeguard our democracy.

Join us on this journey as we stand guard over the Constitution and navigate the complexities of these challenging times together.
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About your hosts

Chris Williams

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Chris Williams is a dedicated member of the Constitution Commandos, hailing from the vibrant state of Mississippi. Born and raised in the heart of the Magnolia state, Chris has an unwavering commitment to upholding the principles and values enshrined in the United States Constitution.

With a background in the racing industry, Chris has developed a keen sense of precision and attention to detail. His expertise lies in balancing and blueprinting racing engines, where he has honed his craft to perfection. This combination of technical mastery and a determined spirit makes Chris an invaluable asset to the Constitution Commandos.

Beyond his mechanical prowess, Chris is also a talented musician. Whether it be taking the stage as a performer, contributing his instrumental skills as a studio musician, or pouring his heart into writing soul-stirring songs, he uses music as a powerful tool to inspire anyone who listens to his work.

Chris's entrepreneurial spirit has led him to venture into various small businesses, primarily in the realm of residential construction. This experience has equipped him with a practical understanding of the challenges faced by hardworking Americans.

As a proud member of the Army National Guard and a veteran of the U.S. Navy, Chris has demonstrated his allegiance to his country and a commitment to defending the freedoms and liberties enumerated by the Constitution of the United States. His military service has instilled in him a sense of duty and honor that he carries with him in all his endeavors.

Whether it's on the racetrack, on stage, in the business world, or in support and defense of the Constitution, Chris Williams is true American patriot. He is a vital member of the Constitution Commandos, and he tirelessly works to protect and preserve the essence of America's founding principles.

Patrick Williams

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Patrick Williams, a distinguished cohost of The Constitution Commandos, is a true patriot who has demonstrated his devotion to the ideals of the Constitution through both his military service and his advocacy work. Having served in the prestigious 82nd Airborne of the United States Army, Patrick brings a unique perspective to discussions about the importance of constitutional rights.

Enlisting in the military was a natural choice for Patrick, driven by his deep love for his country and a desire to protect the freedoms that make it unique. As a member of the 82nd Airborne, he underwent grueling training and gained invaluable experience in military operations. Patrick's time in the Army not only instilled in him a strong sense of discipline and teamwork but also highlighted the vital role that the Constitution plays in guiding and safeguarding the actions of our armed forces.

After completing his military service, Patrick continued to carry the spirit of duty and service into his civilian life. As a cohost of The Constitution Commandos, he utilizes his firsthand knowledge and experiences to shed light on the constitutional implications of various issues facing our nation today. Through thought-provoking discussions, Patrick underscores the importance of vigilance in protecting our rights and the need for an informed citizenry to actively participate in the democratic process.

Patrick's military background, coupled with his passion for constitutional principles, allows him to provide unique insights into the balance between national security and individual liberties. His comprehensive understanding of military matters, enriches the discussions on The Constitution Commandos, empowering listeners to engage in informed debates about the intersection of constitutional rights.

Patrick Williams, the All American Commando, exemplifies the honor, commitment, and dedication of a true American patriot. Through his service in the esteemed 82nd Airborne and his role as a cohost on The Constitution Commandos, he embodies the importance of defending and upholding the principles enshrined in the Constitution, ensuring a strong and enduring legacy for generations to come.